Innovations in Industrial Manufacturing, Material and Transport Technologies | Innoget

Find Innovations, Patents and Knowhow in Industrial Manufacturing, Material, Transport Technologies, Food Packaging, Nanomaterials and Material Science

Technology scouting and crowdsourcing have created as a primary component for industry development. Open Science and Open Innovation is facilitating coordinated efforts in the field of modern advances, for instance, materials, 2d Printing, material science, food packaging, nanomaterials and aerospace technologies. Coordinated effort in innovative work between the industry and outside groups of specialists, for instance, Universities, research organizations, Startups and researchers is flourishing advanced and new item improvements. Underneath, you will find a full rundown of Technology Offers related to Industrial Manufacturing, Material and Transport Technologies.

Yissum - Research Development Company of the Hebrew University posted this:

Pre-filing Nov. 2016 Project ID : 9-2016-4371

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have developed a carbon dioxide (CO2) capture process for treating exhausts gas using a polymer membrane. Carbon sequestration requires a multi-step procedure whereby waste CO2 from large point sources, is captured, transported to storage sites and deposited. Carbon capture is a critical step in this process and represents a significant portion of the overall cost. This newly developed exhaust gas treatment system for CO2 capture offers numerous advantages over existing technology including: reduction in environmental harmful exhaust gases from carbon capture process; minimisation of installation space requirements; and a significant reduction in installation costs. In recent years there has been an accelerated development of technology focused on the reduction of CO2 emissions, due in part to the increase of climate change mitigation focused regulations. Advanced carbon capture technology is at the forefront of research centred on the reduction of CO2 emissions. Prior commercialised carbon capture technologies have neglected to incorporate methods for handling the unavoidable harmful exhaust gasses present in the carbon capture process. Consequently, there is a need for methods of managing these gasses within the carbon capture process. Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have met this challenge and designed a sophisticated polymer membrane process capable of treating the harmful exhaust gasses present during common carbon capture method. This advanced technology addresses the necessity of managing these gasses and their known negative environmental implications. This newly developed exhaust gas treatment system for carbon capture offers numerous advantages over existing technology. Specifically, harmful exhaust gasses can be removed; installation space, of the desulfurization facility, can be minimized and process costs reduced through the application of exhaust gas treatment device using the polymer separator.

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER) have developed a method of manufacturing high-density CIS thin film for solar cells. This innovative technology relates to a method of manufacturing high-density CIS thin film for solar cell and a method of manufacturing a thin film solar cell using the CIS thin film. Specifically, this technology relates to a method of manufacturing CIS thin-film by coating CIS, CIGS or CZTS nano-powders on a substrate via non-vacuum coating, followed by heat treatment with the cavities between the nano-powders being filled with elements such as copper, indium, gallium, zinc, tin, etc. Solar cells directly converting sunlight into electric energy have various merits such as avoidance of contamination, infinite resource and semi-permanent lifespan, and are thus anticipated as an energy source capable of solving the problem of energy depletion. A key component in solar cell production is the use of a semiconductor material for solar energy absorption. A CIS or GCIS thin film is a compound semiconductor which possesses a higher conversion efficiency, of about 19.9%, than other thin film solar cells and, due to its capability to be fabricated to a thickness of 10 micros or less, can be stably operated even after long-term use. What’s more, CIS or GCIS is anticipated as an inexpensive, highly efficient solar cell capable of replacing silicon. Solar cells are classified into five types depending on materials for a photo-absorption layer, and a silicon solar cell is most widely used in the art. Recently, however, a rapid increase in raw material costs due to undersupply of silicon has led to increasing interest in thin film solar cells. Thin film solar cells are manufactured to a low thickness, thereby providing merits such as low consumption of material, lightweight, wide application ranges, and the like. A GCIS solar cell is formed using a thin film having a thickness of several micrometres by vacuum deposition, or by precursor deposition in a non-vacuum state and heat treatment of the precursor-deposited thin film. Vacuum deposition is advantageous in that it provides a highly efficient absorption layer. However, vacuum deposition disadvantageously provides low uniformity and requires expensive equipment in forming a large area absorption layer, and causes a material loss of about 20% to 50%, which leads to high manufacturing costs. The inventors of the present invention carried out extensive studies to obtain a method of manufacturing a high-density CIS thin film, CIGS thin film or CZTS thin film through the non-vacuum coating. Subsequently identifying that high-density CIS thin film can be formed when heat treating the CIS thin film, CIGS thin film, CZTS thin film, with cavities of the film filled with filling elements such as copper, indium, gallium, zinc, tin, and the like. The technology, developed and presented by the KIER, has been conceived to solve the problems related to CIS fabrication for solar cells. This advanced technology offers a refined method for manufacturing high-density CIS thin film for solar cell and method of manufacturing thin film solar cell using the same, through a streamlined method which provides high-density CIS thin film while also minimising manufacturing costs and time requirements.

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER) have developed an innovative device for controlling sample temperature during photoelectric and solar cell measurement. This technology specifically relates to a device for maintaining a constant temperature of solar cell samples in a procedure for measuring photoelectric and solar cell characteristic. This advanced technology is particularly valuable in response to the increasing attention being placed on alternative next-generation clean energy sources. As such, greater scientific research focus is being paid to fossil fuel alternatives, such as solar cells. Solar cells directly converting sunlight into electric energy have various merits such as avoidance of contamination, infinite resource and semi-permanent lifespan, and are thus anticipated as an energy source capable of solving the problem of energy depletion. Solar cells are semiconductor devices for solar energy generation. Performance indicators determine the value of a solar cell, for example; spectral responsibility, open circuit voltage, short circuit voltage, short circuit current, conversion efficiency and maximum output. These performance indicators are determined by measuring photoelectric characteristics using a test called Standard Test Condition (STC). For common crystalline silicon solar cells, which have relatively good thermal conductivity, and thin film solar cell, the indirect method of controlling sample temperature is fully efficient to due effective heat exchange between a sample stage and a sample. However, in the case of a thin film solar cell using a thick glass substrate or a solar cell that has an additional jig for measurement, the heat exchange between a sample stage and a sample is not effective. The inefficiencies experienced when measuring solar cell properties, of some solar cells, arise due to the difficulty encountered when attempting to maintain the temperature of the measurement target solar cell at values similar to those prescribed by STC conditions. Also, in the case of a dye-sensitized solar cell, which requires a relatively long time for measurement, the cell must be exposed to light for a prolonged period, making temperature measurements difficult to attain as well as suffering issues because of prolonged photo-irradiation. The technology, developed and presented by the KIER, has been conceived to solve the problems related to controlling sample temperatures during photoelectric and solar cell measurements. This advanced technology offers a refined, indirect, method for controlling sample temperatures, and may be used for measuring various photoelectric and solar cell characteristics.

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have developed a new apparatus for producing silicon nanocrystals based on inductively coupled plasma. Silicon nanocrystals have been widely investigated for several years because of their many interesting properties and potential use in several applications. Recently, silicon nanocrystals have been used in solar cells and light emitting device (LEDs). Silicon is an environmentally friendly material and is utilised for various applications in the field of electronic materials. The field of silicon nanocrystal production has grown enormously of late, in response to the observation of quantum confinement in porous silicon. Silicon is already widely used in the semiconductor industry, in large part because of its nontoxic properties and abundance, being the second most abundant element in the earth’s crust. Due to the high capacity of silicon paired with its relatively environmentally friendly properties it is an ideal material for use as a replacement to more commonly used environmentally costly materials. The common process of producing silicon nanocrystals can be classified into three distinct areas: solid-state reaction, liquid state reaction, and vapour state reaction. The solid-state reaction is the process whereby a thin film of SiO2, Si3N4 or the like containing excess Silicon (Si) is formed and subjected to heat treatment to enable the condensation of silicon and subsequent formation of silicon nanocrystals in a SiO2, Si3N4 or SiC matrix. In the liquid state reaction, silicon nanocrystals are prepared via a chemical reaction of silicon compounds, this is done through the application of variant methods, for example the high-temperature supercritical method. In the vapour state reaction, silicon nanocrystals are prepared by passing a silane compound gas through a high energy region such as laser or plasma. In the case of all three traditional silicon nanocrystals reaction methods (solid, liquid and gas) the process incurs significant cost due to the substantial need for heat energy and expensive deposition equipment. What’s more, in the liquid State reaction issues arise due to the severe difficulty in controlling particle size, which in turn leads to poor crystallinity quality. The vapour state reaction incurs further issues due to the extreme use of energy resulting in aggregated nanocrystals and the formation of secondary particles. To overcome the inherent issues of solid, liquid and vapour silicon nanocrystal reactions non-thermal plasma, such as inductively coupled plasma (IPC) has begun to be used. However, the conventional ICP-based apparatus has limitations and can result in issues pertaining to the management of the particle size of silicon nanocrystals, as well as extending reaction time and deteriorating silicon nanocrystal quality. To combat the aforementioned limitations in silicon nanocrystal production a new apparatus method has been designed, which can minimise plasma diffusion inside the reactor during production using ICP to improve the particle size characteristics and quality of the silicon nanocrystals.

Yissum - Research Development Company of the Hebrew University posted this:

core-island-shell nanocrystals Project ID : 14-2018-4648