Materials Technology Technology Offers

Yissum - Research Development Company of the Hebrew University posted this:

Pre-filing Nov. 2016 Project ID : 9-2016-4371

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have developed a carbon dioxide (CO2) capture process for treating exhausts gas using a polymer membrane. Carbon sequestration requires a multi-step procedure whereby waste CO2 from large point sources, is captured, transported to storage sites and deposited. Carbon capture is a critical step in this process and represents a significant portion of the overall cost. This newly developed exhaust gas treatment system for CO2 capture offers numerous advantages over existing technology including: reduction in environmental harmful exhaust gases from carbon capture process; minimisation of installation space requirements; and a significant reduction in installation costs. In recent years there has been an accelerated development of technology focused on the reduction of CO2 emissions, due in part to the increase of climate change mitigation focused regulations. Advanced carbon capture technology is at the forefront of research centred on the reduction of CO2 emissions. Prior commercialised carbon capture technologies have neglected to incorporate methods for handling the unavoidable harmful exhaust gasses present in the carbon capture process. Consequently, there is a need for methods of managing these gasses within the carbon capture process. Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have met this challenge and designed a sophisticated polymer membrane process capable of treating the harmful exhaust gasses present during common carbon capture method. This advanced technology addresses the necessity of managing these gasses and their known negative environmental implications. This newly developed exhaust gas treatment system for carbon capture offers numerous advantages over existing technology. Specifically, harmful exhaust gasses can be removed; installation space, of the desulfurization facility, can be minimized and process costs reduced through the application of exhaust gas treatment device using the polymer separator.

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have developed a new apparatus for producing silicon nanocrystals based on inductively coupled plasma. Silicon nanocrystals have been widely investigated for several years because of their many interesting properties and potential use in several applications. Recently, silicon nanocrystals have been used in solar cells and light emitting device (LEDs). Silicon is an environmentally friendly material and is utilised for various applications in the field of electronic materials. The field of silicon nanocrystal production has grown enormously of late, in response to the observation of quantum confinement in porous silicon. Silicon is already widely used in the semiconductor industry, in large part because of its nontoxic properties and abundance, being the second most abundant element in the earth’s crust. Due to the high capacity of silicon paired with its relatively environmentally friendly properties it is an ideal material for use as a replacement to more commonly used environmentally costly materials. The common process of producing silicon nanocrystals can be classified into three distinct areas: solid-state reaction, liquid state reaction, and vapour state reaction. The solid-state reaction is the process whereby a thin film of SiO2, Si3N4 or the like containing excess Silicon (Si) is formed and subjected to heat treatment to enable the condensation of silicon and subsequent formation of silicon nanocrystals in a SiO2, Si3N4 or SiC matrix. In the liquid state reaction, silicon nanocrystals are prepared via a chemical reaction of silicon compounds, this is done through the application of variant methods, for example the high-temperature supercritical method. In the vapour state reaction, silicon nanocrystals are prepared by passing a silane compound gas through a high energy region such as laser or plasma. In the case of all three traditional silicon nanocrystals reaction methods (solid, liquid and gas) the process incurs significant cost due to the substantial need for heat energy and expensive deposition equipment. What’s more, in the liquid State reaction issues arise due to the severe difficulty in controlling particle size, which in turn leads to poor crystallinity quality. The vapour state reaction incurs further issues due to the extreme use of energy resulting in aggregated nanocrystals and the formation of secondary particles. To overcome the inherent issues of solid, liquid and vapour silicon nanocrystal reactions non-thermal plasma, such as inductively coupled plasma (IPC) has begun to be used. However, the conventional ICP-based apparatus has limitations and can result in issues pertaining to the management of the particle size of silicon nanocrystals, as well as extending reaction time and deteriorating silicon nanocrystal quality. To combat the aforementioned limitations in silicon nanocrystal production a new apparatus method has been designed, which can minimise plasma diffusion inside the reactor during production using ICP to improve the particle size characteristics and quality of the silicon nanocrystals.

Yissum - Research Development Company of the Hebrew University posted this:

core-island-shell nanocrystals Project ID : 14-2018-4648

Yissum - Research Development Company of the Hebrew University posted this:

3D Printing of 100% Wood Project ID : 9-2018-4541
3D Printing of 100% Wood