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Yissum - Research Development Company of the Hebrew University posted this:

Cluster11 Project ID : 8-2018-4605

Yissum - Research Development Company of the Hebrew University posted this:

Cluster11 Project ID : 8-2017-4417

Yissum - Research Development Company of the Hebrew University posted this:

Future Meat Technologies LTD. Project ID : 26-2018-4638

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have developed a new palladium alloy composite membrane for hydrogen separation. Palladium-based membranes have been used for decades in hydrogen extraction because of their high permeability and good surface properties and because palladium, like all metals, is 100% selective for hydrogen transport. Palladium membranes have been used to provide very pure hydrogen for semiconductor manufacture, fuel cells, and laboratory use. Palladium also combines excellent hydrogen transport and discrimination properties with resistance to high temperatures, corrosion, and solvents. Further, palladium is easily formed into tubes that are easily fabricated into hydrogen extraction and palladium surfaces are not readily poisoned by carbon monoxide, steam, and hydrocarbons. This exciting technology relates to an advanced preparation method of palladium alloy composite membrane for hydrogen separation. Generally, a separation membrane used for the preparation of ultra-high pure hydrogen, has low permeability. This possesses a significant challenge to hydrogen separation. Intensive and extensive research on the improvement of the selective permeability of membranes used for hydrogen separation has been, and is presently, being carried out. The commonly used non-porous palladium membrane has high hydrogen selectivity but low permeability. Therefore, despite the selective hydrogen permeability of the separation membrane being intended to be improved by coating the surface of the porous material with a thin palladium membrane, the membrane still suffers due to frequent deformities caused by phases change of the lattice structure during hydrogen absorption. With the goal of preventing such deformations, a palladium alloy separation membrane is primarily used, at present. However, this common method of using a metal alloyed with palladium, also incur limitations. Notably the frequent palladium-copper alloy membrane suffers low hydrogen selectivity and poor adhesion, issues which commonly lead to brakes in the palladium-copper alloy separation membrane. This advanced technology has been designed to overcome the common issues experienced during the application of palladium alloyed membranes for hydrogen separation. An objective of this technology is the provision of an advantageous palladium alloy composite membrane, which requires a small amount of palladium and thus possess high hydrogen selectivity, high durability and enables improvements in properties of the separation membrane, regardless of the kind of support.

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have developed a carbon dioxide (CO2) capture process for treating exhausts gas using a polymer membrane. Carbon sequestration requires a multi-step procedure whereby waste CO2 from large point sources, is captured, transported to storage sites and deposited. Carbon capture is a critical step in this process and represents a significant portion of the overall cost. This newly developed exhaust gas treatment system for CO2 capture offers numerous advantages over existing technology including: reduction in environmental harmful exhaust gases from carbon capture process; minimisation of installation space requirements; and a significant reduction in installation costs. In recent years there has been an accelerated development of technology focused on the reduction of CO2 emissions, due in part to the increase of climate change mitigation focused regulations. Advanced carbon capture technology is at the forefront of research centred on the reduction of CO2 emissions. Prior commercialised carbon capture technologies have neglected to incorporate methods for handling the unavoidable harmful exhaust gasses present in the carbon capture process. Consequently, there is a need for methods of managing these gasses within the carbon capture process. Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have met this challenge and designed a sophisticated polymer membrane process capable of treating the harmful exhaust gasses present during common carbon capture method. This advanced technology addresses the necessity of managing these gasses and their known negative environmental implications. This newly developed exhaust gas treatment system for carbon capture offers numerous advantages over existing technology. Specifically, harmful exhaust gasses can be removed; installation space, of the desulfurization facility, can be minimized and process costs reduced through the application of exhaust gas treatment device using the polymer separator.

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have developed a new method of managing the inherent limitations of heat pumps, in terms of their application for unpredictable heat energy sources. Heat pumps are devices that can produce hot water with a high temperature using a heat source with a low temperature. In general, heat pumps produce hot water with a set temperature and a set flow rate using a heat source that is introduced with both predetermined temperature and flow rate. However, with the increased use of new renewable heat sources, such as geothermal heat, sewage heat and solar heat; there is a need for heat pumps with the capacity to manage heat sources with characteristically unpredictable temperatures and flow rates that are prone to sudden change. What’s more, there is an increasing requirement for heat pumps capable of supplying hot water at varying temperatures, as opposed to one set temperature – to accommodate demand requirements. Conventional heat pumps are limited in their capability to sufficiently align the characteristics of heat sources and the characteristics of the demand source. Generally, demand sources for heat pump energy require both consistent temperatures and flow rates. Meaning that heat sources, such as renewables, which suffer unreliable temperatures and flow rates are generally unsuitable for heat pump use. The innovative broadband heat pump technology presented offers a unique system which can overcome the inherent limitations of heat pump technology. This technology enables the control of heat source temperatures in order that heat supplied is at a uniform temperature and can be tailored to meet the requirements of the demand source. This broadband heat pump technology has several beneficial implications. Notably the pump is capable of being supplied with hot water with various levels of temperature, which can then be supplied to any desired demand source. Additionally, since heat sources with varying levels of temperature, notably including renewable energy sources, can be used, energy availability increases, and the pump offers a gateway for renewable energy use.

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

The present technology relates to a process and apparatus for recovering high-purity olefin from mixed gasses containing light olefins (ethylene, propylene, etc.). Olefin is a long chain polymer synthetic-fibre created when ethylene and/or propylene gases are polymerized under specific conditions. The resultant material, olefin, has a myriad of applications in manufacturing, household products, clothing and petrochemical products including plastics and packaging. Due to the non-toxicity of olefin in water, as well as the structural stability of materials manufactured using olefin fibre, the material, in its purest form, offers numerous advantages to different sectors and in several industrial processes. Generally, distillation techniques have been used to separate olefin/paraffin mixtures. However, significant challenges arise during these conventional distillation processes due to the small difference in boiling point between olefin and paraffin, and the subsequent requirement that distillation columns must have several distillation trays. This requirement later incurs high energy and equipment costs. In recent years, technology advancements have enabled the reduction in olefin separation costs by using a process of separating olefin by absorption as opposed to the traditional method of separation through distillation. This advanced olefin separation technology builds on the capabilities of recently developed absorption methods, through the addition of a sophisticated displacement desorption process of desorbing absorbed ethylene using a desorbent. Light olefins production is a multi-billion-dollar commodity industry, and the olefin separation process is the most energy-intensive operation in the production of ethylene, propylene and other high-volume olefin petrochemicals. Using this patented displacement-desorption process the high energy requirement of olefin separation can be reduced, thus saving resources and improving economic efficiency.

Korea Institute of Energy Research posted this:

Researchers at the Korea Institute of Energy Research have developed a new apparatus for producing silicon nanocrystals based on inductively coupled plasma. Silicon nanocrystals have been widely investigated for several years because of their many interesting properties and potential use in several applications. Recently, silicon nanocrystals have been used in solar cells and light emitting device (LEDs). Silicon is an environmentally friendly material and is utilised for various applications in the field of electronic materials. The field of silicon nanocrystal production has grown enormously of late, in response to the observation of quantum confinement in porous silicon. Silicon is already widely used in the semiconductor industry, in large part because of its nontoxic properties and abundance, being the second most abundant element in the earth’s crust. Due to the high capacity of silicon paired with its relatively environmentally friendly properties it is an ideal material for use as a replacement to more commonly used environmentally costly materials. The common process of producing silicon nanocrystals can be classified into three distinct areas: solid-state reaction, liquid state reaction, and vapour state reaction. The solid-state reaction is the process whereby a thin film of SiO2, Si3N4 or the like containing excess Silicon (Si) is formed and subjected to heat treatment to enable the condensation of silicon and subsequent formation of silicon nanocrystals in a SiO2, Si3N4 or SiC matrix. In the liquid state reaction, silicon nanocrystals are prepared via a chemical reaction of silicon compounds, this is done through the application of variant methods, for example the high-temperature supercritical method. In the vapour state reaction, silicon nanocrystals are prepared by passing a silane compound gas through a high energy region such as laser or plasma. In the case of all three traditional silicon nanocrystals reaction methods (solid, liquid and gas) the process incurs significant cost due to the substantial need for heat energy and expensive deposition equipment. What’s more, in the liquid State reaction issues arise due to the severe difficulty in controlling particle size, which in turn leads to poor crystallinity quality. The vapour state reaction incurs further issues due to the extreme use of energy resulting in aggregated nanocrystals and the formation of secondary particles. To overcome the inherent issues of solid, liquid and vapour silicon nanocrystal reactions non-thermal plasma, such as inductively coupled plasma (IPC) has begun to be used. However, the conventional ICP-based apparatus has limitations and can result in issues pertaining to the management of the particle size of silicon nanocrystals, as well as extending reaction time and deteriorating silicon nanocrystal quality. To combat the aforementioned limitations in silicon nanocrystal production a new apparatus method has been designed, which can minimise plasma diffusion inside the reactor during production using ICP to improve the particle size characteristics and quality of the silicon nanocrystals.