Slow positrons for deep defect detection

  • RAMOT at Tel Aviv University Ltd.
  • From Israel
  • Responsive
  • Knowhow and Research output

Summary of the technology

Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) is a unique method of measuring point defects [3]. It is sensitive to defects as small as mono-vacancies (sub-nano scale), in concentration as low as 10-6 appm. Moreover, depending on the apparatus used, it can probe both the surface and bulk regions of the material, allowing depth profiling of defects. A slow positron beam is essentially a collimated, variable, low energy, positron source for PAS measurements. The collimation of the beam and energy control allows for non distractive studding of different layers of the material [4].
A typical slow positron beam is composed of three main components: (1) Positron source, (2) positron moderator, (3) positron transport beam line. Positrons are emitted from the source isotropically with a wide energy distribution, with a typical mean of 200 keV (for 22Na). In order to produce a mono-energetic beam, they are passed through a moderator, in which they lose most of their initial energy (up to few eV). Then they are shaped into a beam and accelerated using electro-magnetic fields to the sample. By varying the fields, one can control the positron energy.

Project ID : 11-2012-316

Details of the Technology Offer

Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) is a unique method of measuring point defects [3]. It is sensitive to defects as small as mono-vacancies (sub-nano scale), in concentration as low as 10-6 appm. Moreover, depending on the apparatus used, it can probe both the surface and bulk regions of the material, allowing depth profiling of defects. A slow positron beam is essentially a collimated, variable, low energy, positron source for PAS measurements. The collimation of the beam and energy control allows for non distractive studding of different layers of the material [4].
A typical slow positron beam is composed of three main components: (1) Positron source, (2) positron moderator, (3) positron transport beam line. Positrons are emitted from the source isotropically with a wide energy distribution, with a typical mean of 200 keV (for 22Na). In order to produce a mono-energetic beam, they are passed through a moderator, in which they lose most of their initial energy (up to few eV). Then they are shaped into a beam and accelerated using electro-magnetic fields to the sample. By varying the fields, one can control the positron energy.

Project manager

Rona Samler
VP, BD Physical Science, Medical Device, Chemistry

Project researchers

Eliezer Piasetzky
T.A.U Tel Aviv University, Exact Sciences
School of Physics and Astronomy

Related Keywords

  • Coatings
  • Chemistry
  • Coatings and adhesives manufactures
  • Material Sciences
  • Coatings and Films

About RAMOT at Tel Aviv University Ltd.

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